Law is a sector that is regularly criticised for its lack of female leadership, despite numerous studies -including one from McKinsey & Co - indicating that gender diversity coincides with improved financial performance. In fact the study indicates that gender diverse organisations are 15% more likely to outperform their competitors.​
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Gender pay gulf retains the spotlight

Posted by: Laurence Simons 30/09/16

We’ve spoken about the importance of pay parity and promoting women in law regularly in recent months, and a study from The Law Society in the UK has proven once again that it’s a topic that the legal profession can’t shy away from.

Law is a sector that is regularly criticised for its lack of female leadership, despite numerous studies -including one from McKinsey & Co - indicating that gender diversity coincides with improved financial performance. In fact the study indicates that gender diverse organisations are 15% more likely to outperform their competitors.

Yet The Law Society’s recent salary survey found that on average male lawyers still earn 19.2% more than their equally qualified female counterparts. On average men are paid more than females at every level, from associate through to equity partner, with the gap widening as women progress through the ranks. According to the study male lawyers earn on average £60,000 while female lawyers earn an average of just £48,500.

This research is in line with a recent study from Deloitte, which found that, at the current rate of growth, the UK will not achieve pay equality until 2069 - 99 years after the Equal Pay Act was first introduced. Deloitte’s study also found that the pay increased as women progressed throughout their careers in all ten of the most popular graduate careers.

However, in a positive sign of progress the survey also recorded that since 2000, women’s salaries in this category had grown faster than men’s, 18.6% and 10.2% respectively. A number of firms are working towards increasing inclusivity and implementing initiatives to attract and retain female talent, but without directly addressing the issue of pay parity they risk losing incredibly talented legal minds.

Tagged In: Women in Law
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